Academic

An investigation reported in 1960 into the comparative differences between microfilm and bound periodical volumes at Colby Junior College (New London, New Hampshire) and Abraham Baldwin College (Tifton, Georgia) showed thatthe comparative cost of microfilm purchase vs. binding costs for a sample of 5 journals was almost exactly equal, $40.37 in binding costs and $41.00 for microfilm purchase.       (Source)

A study reported in 1976 at Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, of science/technology periodicals (population: 3,948 titles; sample size: 1,519 titles or 38%) for the period 1968-72 showed thatthe “typical” science/technology journal was issued once each 51 days and generated “about” 1.5 bound volumes each year.                       (Source)

A study reported in 1978 at the undergraduate library of the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, of patron success rate in finding books over a 5-week period (sample size: 1,010 patrons; responding: 503 or 49.5%, involving 2,375 titles) showed thatthe 828 titles not available involved 1,025 volumes. The 2 main reasons for unavailability were: volumes checked out (729 or 71.1%) and volumes unaccounted for (208 or 20.3%). Binding accounted for 22 (2.1%) volumes, while interlibrary loan accounted for 2 (0.2%) volumes.             (Source)

A 1978 survey of major biomedical libraries (primarily those serving accredited medical schools) (survey size: 120 libraries; responding: 88 or 73%) showed thatusing microform copy in lieu of binding hard copy volumes of abstracts and indexes was not common practice. Only 1 (1%) library reported using microforms in lieu of binding all volumes of abstracts and indexes, 7 (8%) libraries reported using microforms in lieu of binding some abstracts and indexes, while 78 (89%) libraries reported using no microforms in lieu of binding abstracts or indexes. 2 (2%) libraries did not reply.                         (Source)

A 1980 survey of law school libraries with collections in excess of 175,000 volumes (sample size: 50; responding: 37 or 70%) showed thatthe degree to which periodical titles were bound was as follows:

                40-60% bound                                              2 libraries

                80-89% bound                                              6 libraries

                90-95% bound                                            13 libraries

                96-100% bound                                          14 libraries

                no answer                                                     2 libraries                (Source)

Special

A 1978 survey of major biomedical libraries (primarily those serving accredited medical schools) (survey size: 120 libraries; responding: 88 or 73%) showed thatusing microform copy in lieu of binding hard copy volumes of abstracts and indexes was not common practice. Only 1 (1%) library reported using microforms in lieu of binding all volumes of abstracts and indexes, 7 (8%) libraries reported using microforms in lieu of binding some abstracts and indexes, while 78 (89%) libraries reported using no microforms in lieu of binding abstracts or indexes. 2 (2%) libraries did not reply.                         (Source)

A 1980 survey of law school libraries with collections in excess of 175,000 volumes (sample size: 50; responding: 37 or 70%) showed thatthe degree to which periodical titles were bound was as follows:

                40-60% bound                                              2 libraries

                80-89% bound                                              6 libraries

                90-95% bound                                            13 libraries

                96-100% bound                                          14 libraries

                no answer                                                     2 libraries                (Source)

Dr. David Kohl

 "Libraries in the digital age are experiencing the most profound transformation since ancient Mesopotamian scribes first began gathering and organizing cuneiform tablets."

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