General

A survey in 1974 of the 47 charter members of the OCLC network, including site visits and interviews (148) with all levels of library personnel in member libraries, showed that95% of the charter members made at least some use of the OCLC data base for ILL work. 59% searched all Roman alphabet requests in the data base, while 41% used it on a more limited basis for ILL verification and location finding.                (Source)

        Ibid…. showed thatindications from limited data suggested that use of the OCLC data base for ILL verification was successful 75 to 80% of the time in medium- to small-sized libraries (libraries with budgets for printed materials under $500,000), while 1 large library (printed materials budget $500,000+) showed a verification success rate of 24% for pre-1950 imprints, 34% for 1950-67 imprints, and 60% for 1968 imprints.              (Source)

        Ibid…. showed that44% of the ILL librarians indicated that use of the OCLC data base resulted in noticeable, though slight, decreases in the processing and receipt time for monographs.                   (Source)

A study of ILL in New England of all types of libraries in 1976 (sample size: 191; usable responses: 113 or 58%), of requests generated in a month, showed thaton the average 28% of all ILL transactions were verified on the OCLC data base.                (Source)

A survey reported in 1982 of 144 libraries contracting for OCLC services through the Bibliographic Center for Research (126 or 87.5% responding) showed thatwhen 2 or more copies of a work were acquired at 1 time 44.4% of the respondents reported they would not indicate multiple-copy ownership in the OCLC record if all copies went into the same collection, while 30.2% reported they would not indicate multiple-copy ownership even if copies went into different collections.                   (Source)

        Ibid…. showed thatwhen a subsequent copy of a title cataloged earlier on OCLC was purchased 70.6% of the respondents reported they would not enter information on the subsequent copy into the OCLC record if the copy were going into the same collection as the earlier copy, while 30.2% reported they would not enter information on the subsequent copy even if it were going into a different collection from the earlier copy.                      (Source)

        Ibid…. showed thatwhen the only copy of a work in the library was withdrawn 70.6% of the respondents reported canceling the holdings recorded in the OCLC data base, while 19.8% reported they did not, 6.4% reported varying practices, and 3.2% did not reply to the question.                      (Source)

        Ibid…. showed that, when 1 of several copies of a work in the library that were previously cataloged on OCLC was withdrawn, 21.4% of the respondents reported that the OCLC holdings were updated, while 65.9% of the respondents reported that the holdings were not, 4.8% reported that their practice varied, and 7.9% did not answer.                         (Source)

A survey reported in 1982 of libraries participating in the Florida Library Information Network (FLIN) including academic, public, school and special libraries (survey size: “approximately 530”; responding: 372 or 70%) showed thatthe average number of hours per week spent on interlibrary loan operation in individual libraries by type of institution was as follows:

                college/university libraries                                   52.2 hours/week

                public libraries                                                   15.6 hours/week

                state institutions                                                  11.1 hours/week

                government libraries                                             9.5 hours/week

                corporation libraries                                             9.3 hours/week

                community college/junior college libraries              5.6 hours/week

                military libraries                                                    2.5 hours/week

                school libraries                                                     1.3 hours/week

                other                                                                 12.7 hours/week                   (Source)

Academic

A study of ILL operations during the first 2 months of 1972 at Trent University Library in Peterborough, Ontario, showed thatthe average ILL request to borrow materials outside of Trent took 35.6 minutes (31.5 minutes nonprofessional time and 4.9 minutes of professional time) while ILL loans to other libraries of Trent material took 11.1 minutes of nonprofessional time. Total average time spent on all ILL transactions was 29.5 minutes each.                (Source)

        Ibid…. showed thatthe average ILL request to borrow materials outside of Trent took more staff time (professional and nonprofessional combined) for faculty requests (42.5 minutes each) than for undergraduate requests (29.4 minutes each).                         (Source)

Dr. David Kohl

 "Libraries in the digital age are experiencing the most profound transformation since ancient Mesopotamian scribes first began gathering and organizing cuneiform tablets."

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